Advanced Academic Placement

Advanced Academic Placement (AAP) is one of the two Highly Capable Service Models at the middle school level. Beginning in the Fall of the 2018-19 school year, all six Northshore School District middle school sites will offer AAP courses for incoming sixth grade students qualified for Highly Capable Services. With regards to 7th and 8th grade students, if a qualified Highly Capable student’s neighborhood middle school is already an AAP site (Canyon Park MS, Leota MS, Northshore MS), then that student will be enrolled in AAP course(s) according to their content area designation. If a qualified Highly Capable student’s neighborhood middle school is not a school-wide AAP site, then that student is clustered with other Highly Capable students in Challenge courses.

Advanced Academic Placement provides eligible students an opportunity for advanced level work with students of similar academic ability. Students qualified for AAP have met rigorous thresholds for qualification through a data portfolio including standardized academic achievement, creativity and cognitive measures of potential. Standardized academic achievement data is measured by the Iowa Assessments (ITBS), and students are administered the Iowa Assessments at one full grade level above their current grade level.

Advanced Academic Placement is typically a self-contained classroom for core content areas including English Language Arts, Social Studies, and Science and Math. Students with Highly Capable designation in the content area of Reading are scheduled into AAP ELA and Social Studies courses. Students with Highly Capable designation in the content area of Math are scheduled into AAP Science and Math courses.

Advanced Academic Placement offers students the opportunity to receive enhanced and enriched content. The classroom teacher will differentiate instruction based on student assessment data.

Instruction is developed as a response to ongoing assessment. This enables AAP teachers to compact curriculum, increase pacing, reduce repetition and in doing so, allow for instructional time to extend the content through inclusion of rigorous problems or projects.